How computers learn to recognize objects instantly

Ten years ago, researchers thought that getting a computer to tell the difference between a cat and a dog would be almost impossible. Today, computer vision systems do it with greater than 99 percent accuracy. How? Joseph Redmon works on the YOLO (You Only Look Once) system, an open-source method of object detection that can identify objects in images and video -- from zebras to stop signs -- with lightning-quick speed. In a remarkable live demo, Redmon shows off this important step forward for applications like self-driving cars, robotics and even cancer detection.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

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Machines might actually be better than humans at creativity. So … what’s left for us to do?

Machines might actually be better than humans at creativity. So … what’s left for us to do?

But some jobs — and industries — will still require a human touch. Technology researchers Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson have a guess as to which ones.

IDEAS.TED.COM 

A surprising report published this spring projects that 30 percent of current jobs in the UK might be replaced by automation in the next 15 years. That number is 21 percent in Japan, 35 percent in Germany and a whopping 42 percent in the United States. The losses will come mainly from the transportation, banking and retail industries, and largely around jobs that involve a lot of routine, repeatable tasks.

 

https://ideas.ted.com/machines-might-actually-be-better-than-humans-at-creativity-so-whats-left-for-us-to-do/

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Anouk Wipprecht Social Impact R&D

Anouk Wipprecht Social Impact R&D

Check out my idol, Anouk Wipprecht's, most recent project, Agent Unicorn. She is in the process of designing a 3D printed custom fit unicorn horn that has EEG sensnors inside of it, and whenever your tension is high it turns on a small camera to record what is happening in front of you. The project is inspired to help children living with ADD, to help to understand what is causing attention spikes.

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